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18th Dec 2019

Advances in cancer treatment showcased in London tube posters

Millions of commuters are being informed about an advance in radiotherapy that I helped pioneer.

Posters explaining the radiotherapy technique IMRT have appeared on London Underground stations.

It is part of a campaign by Cancer Research UK to raise awareness of new developments in treating cancer.

The poster tells how IMRT delivers a more precise and stronger dose of radiotherapy over a shorter course. The result is that patients make fewer trips to hospital and have fewer side effects.

It goes on to recount how a patient called David was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018 and began IMRT after treatment with hormone therapy.

The IMRT was completed in a month and was finished in time for David to take his family on a Christmas holiday.

It adds: “David’s treatment wouldn’t exist without research. Right now, your donations can help us to continue to develop better and kinder treatments.”

In collaboration with the Institute of Cancer Research, I was principal investigator in a series of trials that proved the effectiveness of IMRT in reducing potentially debilitating side-effects of the radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancers.

NEW TRIALS

Most recently I am involved in a new trial DARS which aims to improve swallowing after radiotherapy.

The success of the trials with IMRT were such that the Government awarded the Radiotherapy Innovation Fund £22 million to facilitate the adoption of the technology across the NHS. The technique has also been extended to many other forms of cancer, such as prostate.

For more information about Prof Nutting's work please visit the CV page, get in touch or arrange a consultation.